Dust storms, how much do we know about them?

By Haya Albaker Sand and dust storms are meteorological phenomena that happen mostly in arid regions of the world where sand and dust particles are carried from one place to the other by strong winds. They are known to reduce visibility and have a negative impact on people, and especially on those with respiratory illnesses.Continue reading “Dust storms, how much do we know about them?”

‘Mind over matter?’: a historical excursion into the multitude of meanings of ‘placebo’

By Jessy Shallcross The focus of my dissertation is Major Depressive Disorder (MDD).  From a critical neuro-geographical perspective, it examines recent cognitive neuroscience research on MDD. It utilises discourse analysis to explore the experimental methodologies mobilised in this research and asks what kind of depressed subject is presumed, and how this subject is subsequently imagined.Continue reading “‘Mind over matter?’: a historical excursion into the multitude of meanings of ‘placebo’”

Illness, Temporality and the Subjective Allure: An experimental exploration into the performative process of an affirmative suffering

By Dominic Ader A project that seeks to understand how different theories of time might make us rethink the way in which people suffer from long-term illnesses. Bodies are continuously fixed, given limits, placed within containers, segmented; all from external sources, they are impinged upon, moulded. Within the context of health and illness, social scienceContinue reading “Illness, Temporality and the Subjective Allure: An experimental exploration into the performative process of an affirmative suffering”