“Only when we accept that our wants are limited and can be satisfied will we finally enjoy an abundant world” (Kallis 2019). To what extent do you agree with this statement, and why?

by Adam Smith Introduction As technoscience and rationality have emerged as the dominant languages of environmental policy and management, there has been a consistent effort to define the limits of contemporary societies in these terms (Lovbrand et al. 2015; Dryzek 2013). One such example is Rockstrom et al.’s (2009) demarcation of planetary boundaries – aContinue reading ““Only when we accept that our wants are limited and can be satisfied will we finally enjoy an abundant world” (Kallis 2019). To what extent do you agree with this statement, and why?”

Sinking Islands and the Loss of Origin in the Anthropocene

By Warefta Murshed In this blog, I attempt to weave together some of the conceptual themes I’m exploring in my dissertation by examining the challenges that the island nation of Kiribati faces at the forefront of climate change. Climate change is perhaps the most visceral manifestation of the Anthropocene, confronting Kiribati with the very realityContinue reading “Sinking Islands and the Loss of Origin in the Anthropocene”

Caring at mealtimes: a micro-revolutionary activity

By Matt Ensor This blog is an attempt to demonstrate how the current injustices present in the global food system can be addressed by re-centring the notion of care within the way we eat. The current food system is flawed not only from an environmental perspective but also through the implications it has on cultureContinue reading “Caring at mealtimes: a micro-revolutionary activity”